Bar Myths

I want to talk about a touchy subject: bar results and passing the bar. Results came out November 3rd and I realized that next year I’ll be looking for my name on that pass list. Suddenly, this bar exam urban legend is very real and very scary. Time feels like sand escaping through my fingers and no matter how I try to slow its progress my own bar exam gets closer each day.

There are plenty of things in life that people can’t understand until they’ve been there; law school is one. For we who experience and survive its challenges, the next formidable hurdle is the bar exam. I have many classmates who have passed and a few who haven’t. It’s hard to know what to say in the latter situation—there are no words to make it better. The reality is 88.36% of those that took the exam in Texas last July, passed. But a little over 10% did not—that’s for all law schools; none had a 100% pass rate. No matter what law school you attend, the bar exam is a difficult beast for everyone and no one is immune from its sting.

It is a misconception that if you get through law school passing the bar is easy. Only another lawyer or law student really understands. Those who pass the bar are listed, by name, on the Board of Law Examiners webpage. I hate that it’s done this way mostly because Texas Wesleyan is such a small school and it’s easy to determine who’s missing. Imagine if someone took your salary or your list of debts and put them on the web for all to see; that’s the kind of personal invasion I’m talking about.

The bar exam is not your friend, it’s a beating…as Professor Chambers says, “They want to BAR you from the profession.” All we can do is prepare well, have faith in our abilities, and let the chips fall where they may. If I can walk away from that exam and know that I did my 100% best for 2.5 months of bar prep and those three days of testing, people can think what they want. I’ll have nothing to hang my head about. Congratulations to our recent TWU bar passers and much love and admiration to those still fighting the fight.

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About LegalTrenches

I graduated law school in May 2012 and have been blogging about my experience as a non-traditional student since my 2L year. I live over 200 miles from my law school and so I commuted two round trips a week from the beginning. I put almost 1000 miles a week on my car. Law school is crazy. It's even crazier as a non-traditional commuter student, but I wouldn't have had it any other way! I blogged my way through bar prep and sat for the July 2012 Texas Bar exam. Hopefully some of my experiences will help out those taking the bar exam after me. On Nov. 1, 2012, I received my bar results and became an officially licensed Texas lawyer! Follow me as I transition into the legal world as a brand new baby lawyer. I'll try to keep it light and promise to keep it real.

Posted on November 20, 2011, in Uncategorized and tagged , , , . Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

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